Looks like I get to redo my WireGuard VPN server

I’ve blogged about setting up a WireGuard VPN server earlier this year. It’s been running well since, but I needed to take care of some overdue maintenance tasks. Trying to log into the server this morning and I am greeted with “no route to host”. Eh? A quick check on my Vultr UI showed that the VPS had trouble booting. The error suggests a corrupted boot drive. Oops.

Guess what the maintenance task I was looking at was? Creating an Ansible script so I’d be able to stand up the server from scratch in case something like this happened. And yes, the irony of being the guy who regularly preaches to his clients about the need for backups doesn’t quite escape me.

Anyway, at least this gives me an excuse to set up my WireGuard server on OpenBSD. This is something I’ve been thinking about for a while so now I have the perfect excuse for it. I realise that OpenBSD can only use the user space daemon for WireGuard rather than the in-kernel version Linux uses. This is generally good enough for my use case as I’m only looking for added security when I’m on public WiFi and don’t need really high performance.

And yes, this time I’m going to create the Ansible script either as part of the build or directly after :).

How to speed up macOS Time Machine backups

macOS Time Machine is usually set up to work in the background and not overly affect anything that’s going on in the foreground while the user is working. Under normal circumstances, this is desirable behaviour. It is not desirable when you try to take one last backup of a failing SSD before it keels over completely. Which was the unfortunate situation I found myself in.

Turns out there is a sysctl that can be used to disable or enable this behaviour. If you turn it off, the backup in macOS Time Machine runs much faster, at the expense of additional network bandwidth and disk IOPS. The backup daemon will increase disk IOPS usage both for reading and writing.

The sysctl to turn off the low priority backup in the background is:

sudo sysctl debug.lowpri_throttle_enabled=0

Obviously, set the value back to its default of 1 if you want to restore the original behaviour. Based on the atop stats on my home server, network bandwidth usage went up from 5-10% to about 20%, and disk IOPS usage from 7-8% to about 65-70%. The backup is not maxing out the server or client. On my old 6 core Mac Pro, I have no problem running the backup at the higher speed without a big impact to my main work. I suspect that it would be different if I were to run disk intensive applications, though.