Another good reason to keep source file sizes small

Merging a file between SCM branches that is several thousand lines in size and has significant changes in both branches is a good way to have an unpleasant day, even if the SCM that’s being used has good support for cross-branch merging.

Yes, I know, ideally one tries to make sure that two branches don’t diverge that far but that’s not always possible, especially if there are significant changes to the design that affect the merge.

A couple of noteworthy links

It’s bit of a link roundup from the past couple of months. Most of you probably saw these already as I’d think you’re probably reading the same blogs.

C++ links

VS2010 SP1 Beta: What’s in it for C++ developers. While I’m not going to chance installing the beta on my main developer workstation, it looks like there are some interesting features in the service pack. I hope that the IDE stability has also been improved.

Grr… My VC++ Project Is Building Slower in VS2010. What Do I Do Now? (A Step by Step Guide): A good guide showing what to look for when VS2010 builds appear to be slower than VS2008 builds of the same project.

Emacs

Making CamelCase readable with glasses-mode – I’m not a big fan of CamelCase, but I must say this minor mode makes a big difference in readability.

General programming links

Give your programmers professional tools – just too true. I’m extremely lucky that a lot of the companies I worked for including my current employer do recognise that your average developer has different needs than someone working with, say, spreadsheets all day long but some of the hand-me-down boxes with small slow harddrives and slow processors that were inflicted on some dev teams I worked in were definitely putting the brakes on productivity.

A couple of interesting blog posts…

A couple of links to other people’s interesting posts I’ve come across in the last few days.

Raymond Chen on “There is no law that says meetings can’t end early”. I wish more people would take this advice to heart, but that’s been on my Christmas wishlist right next to “create an agenda for a meeting and stick to it”.

Interesting blog post regarding the difference between technology for technology’s sake and using technology to create something. For the record, I tend to be more interested in doing something with my technology “toys” rather than having them purely for having them. That’s probably one of the reasons that I tend not to have the latest, greatest and fastest machines (or phones, cameras etc) but rather buy quality kit and use it for a few years instead.

Do programmers still buy printed books? I know I do, but I’m getting a little more choosy. I’ve bought a couple of books recently that I’d classify more as a waste of a perfectly good tree. That’s unfortunately not unusual for tech books, there are a couple of brilliant ones out there and an awful lot of, how shall I call it, rubbish. I’m also one of those throwbacks to an earlier age who prefer to hold a physical book in their hands rather than stare at a screen. The reason Antonio mentions – switching between book reading mode and computing mode – certainly has something to do with it; after all, if you’re immersed in a book you probably don’t check your email every thirty seconds whereas I’d be tempted to do that if I were to read the book on a computer. Reading on the iPhone is something I’d rather not do, my eyesight is bad enough as it is…

Antonio’s book list his previous blog post also looks very much like I should update my Amazon wish list.